Skip to content Skip to navigation

AgClips

Subscribe   Subscribe to AgClips to keep up on the latest ag and rural news.

Recent AgClips

This dairy startup is trying to introduce the US to quark

Smart Brief | Posted on May 22, 2018 in Agriculture News

 need to make a confession. This was an interview I really wanted to do. I spent over 25 years in consumer packaged goods, specifically in dairy, and have always wanted to see quark succeed in the US market. If you don’t know what quark is, Google it. It is creamy and soft. If yogurt and cream cheese had a love child, it would be quark.I first tried Wünder Creamery’s quark at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. I loved it. Then I met co-founder Kamilya Abilova.

Robots fight weeds in challenge to agrochemical giants

Reuters | Posted on May 22, 2018 in Agriculture News

In a field of sugar beet in Switzerland, a solar-powered robot that looks like a table on wheels scans the rows of crops with its camera, identifies weeds and zaps them with jets of blue liquid from its mechanical tentacles. Undergoing final tests before the liquid is replaced with weedkiller, the Swiss robot is one of new breed of AI weeders that investors say could disrupt the $100 billion pesticides and seeds industry by reducing the need for universal herbicides and the genetically modified (GM) crops that tolerate them.

Oregon lawmakers mull preventing ‘too big to fail’ livestock operations

Capital Press | Posted on May 22, 2018 in Agriculture, SARL Members and Alumni News

he regulatory problems facing a controversial Oregon dairy have raised questions among lawmakers about avoiding “too big to fail” livestock operations in the future.

SARL Members and Alumni News

Oregon lawmakers mull preventing ‘too big to fail’ livestock operations

Capital Press | Posted on May 22, 2018

he regulatory problems facing a controversial Oregon dairy have raised questions among lawmakers about avoiding “too big to fail” livestock operations in the future.

MN Gov. Mark Dayton vetoes bill that gave Enbridge's new pipeline fast-track approval

Minnesota Star Tribune | Posted on May 22, 2018

As expected, Gov. Mark Dayton vetoed legislation that would have allowed Enbridge to build a controversial new oil pipeline without getting regulatory approval.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich wants to crack down on phosphorus runoff that feeds Lake Erie algal blooms

Cleveland.com | Posted on May 17, 2018

Gov. John Kasich said he plans to issue an executive order if state lawmakers won't limit fertilizer use in certain parts of the state that contribute to problematic phosphorus and nitrate runoff in Lake Erie. The Ohio General Assembly in 2015 restricted manure and fertilizer application on snow-covered or wet ground in the western basin of Lake Erie with exceptions such as injecting it into the ground or applying it on a cover crop. Another law required large farm owners to obtain a certification in properly applying fertilizer.

NH:3 contentious renewable energy bills head to governor’s desk

New Hampshire Business Review | Posted on May 16, 2018

New Hampshire’s renewable industry will get a boost – though at a possible cost to ratepayers – if three bills passed last week by lawmakers are signed into law by Gov. Chris Sununu. Senate Bill 446 is perhaps the most far-reaching, increasing fivefold the size of projects that would qualify for net metering.

Connecticut environment groups file federal lawsuit against state

Connecticut Post | Posted on May 16, 2018

Several Connecticut environment groups and companies are taking the state to federal court over the legislature’s decision to remove money from state energy funds in the two-year budget passed in October. The Connecticut Fund for the Environment and 11 other plaintiffs filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court Tuesday in order to stop the $165 million sweep.Using the funding for other than its intended purpose is a breach of the contracts clause of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs argue.

Agriculture News

This dairy startup is trying to introduce the US to quark

Smart Brief | Posted on May 22, 2018

 need to make a confession. This was an interview I really wanted to do. I spent over 25 years in consumer packaged goods, specifically in dairy, and have always wanted to see quark succeed in the US market. If you don’t know what quark is, Google it. It is creamy and soft. If yogurt and cream cheese had a love child, it would be quark.I first tried Wünder Creamery’s quark at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. I loved it. Then I met co-founder Kamilya Abilova.

Robots fight weeds in challenge to agrochemical giants

Reuters | Posted on May 22, 2018

In a field of sugar beet in Switzerland, a solar-powered robot that looks like a table on wheels scans the rows of crops with its camera, identifies weeds and zaps them with jets of blue liquid from its mechanical tentacles. Undergoing final tests before the liquid is replaced with weedkiller, the Swiss robot is one of new breed of AI weeders that investors say could disrupt the $100 billion pesticides and seeds industry by reducing the need for universal herbicides and the genetically modified (GM) crops that tolerate them.

Oregon lawmakers mull preventing ‘too big to fail’ livestock operations

Capital Press | Posted on May 22, 2018

he regulatory problems facing a controversial Oregon dairy have raised questions among lawmakers about avoiding “too big to fail” livestock operations in the future.

US winter wheat forecast down amid drought, surplus

Capital Press | Posted on May 17, 2018

U.S. farmers are expected to harvest their smallest winter wheat crop in more than a decade amid an ongoing drought that has devastated fields across the nation’s breadbasket and a global surplus of the grain that has depressed prices, according to government report. The National Agricultural Statistics Service forecast the size of the nation’s 2018 wheat crop at 1.19 billion bushels. If realized, that would be down 6 percent from the previous year. The last time the nation’s farmers harvested such a small wheat crop was in 2002, when U.S. production fell to 1.137 billion bushels,

A Green Approach to Making Ammonia Could Help Feed the World

University of Central Florida | Posted on May 17, 2018

UCF research team with collaborators at Virginia Tech have developed a new “green” approach to making ammonia that may help make feeding the rising world population more sustainable. “This new approach can facilitate ammonia production using renewable energy, such as electricity generated from solar or wind,” said physics Assistant Professor Xiaofeng Feng.

Federal News

Farm bill heads through House with animal husbandry amendment

Meatingplace (free registration required) | Posted on May 16, 2018

The U.S. House of Representatives begins debate on the farm bill this week, including an amendment designed to stop states from regulating the way farmers raise food animals in other states.

Been there done that; it was called Freedom to Farm

Ag Policy | Posted on May 16, 2018

Edwards writes, “President Donald Trump proposed cuts to farm programs in the 2019 federal budget, but the longer term goal should be to fully repeal all farm subsidies.” Our response to the goal of fully repealing all farm subsidies will be echoed by many of our readers, “Been there, done that, and the result was a very expensive policy disaster.”In reviewing the 1996 Farm Bill, the Cato bulletin glosses over the impact of “Freedom to Farm” with a simple statement: “But Congress reversed course in the late 1990s, and it passed a series of supplemental farm subsidy bills.”What they don’t te

Migrant labor shortage shakes pro-Trump small biz

Newsday | Posted on May 16, 2018

It’s a complaint echoed by crab processors in Maryland, innkeepers and lobster restaurants in Maine and Texas shrimpers who couldn’t get enough workers under the H2-B visa “guest worker” program for nonagricultural workers. East End farmers also are stymied by “a tremendous shortage of labor for low-skilled jobs,” said Long Island Farm Bureau president Karl Novak in a recent discussion of immigration policy with Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley), according to Riverhead Local.Even before unemployment hit a 17-year low, Devine said he couldn’t find enough dependable, drug-free U.S. workers.

Farm Bill could threaten 58 million acres of forest land

Newsweek | Posted on May 16, 2018

The Farm Bill, an all-encompassing multi-year piece of legislation that directs what happens at the Department of Agriculture, has gained attention for its proposed overhaul to the food stamp program.

United States Issues First-Ever WTO Counter Notification Against India’s Market Price Support

USDA | Posted on May 15, 2018

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced that the United States submitted a counter notification in the World Trade Organization (WTO) Committee on Agriculture (COA) on India’s market price support (MPS) for wheat and rice. Filed on May 4, 2018, this is the first ever COA notification under the WTO Agreement on Agriculture regarding another country’s measures. Based on U.S. calculations, it appears that India has substantially underreported its market price support for wheat and rice.

Rural News

Americans in rural areas more likely to die by suicide

CDC | Posted on May 16, 2018

ural counties consistently had higher suicide rates than metropolitan counties from 2001-2015, according to data released today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.  Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States. There were more than half a million suicides during the 2001–2015 study period.“While we’ve seen many causes of death come down in recent years, suicide rates have increased more than 20 percent from 2001 to 2015.

American Airlines bans emotional support amphibians, ferrets, goats and more

Chicago Tribune | Posted on May 16, 2018

First United Airlines barred an emotional support peacock from boarding. Now American Airlines is telling passengers some of their service and emotional support animals — including goats, hedgehogs and tusked creatures — can’t fly. The carrier is joining rival airlines in tightening rules for passengers flying with emotional support animals, expanding the list of animals that can’t fly in addition to requiring customers vouch for their animal’s ability to behave.

Connecticut environment groups file federal lawsuit against state

Connecticut Post | Posted on May 16, 2018

Several Connecticut environment groups and companies are taking the state to federal court over the legislature’s decision to remove money from state energy funds in the two-year budget passed in October. The Connecticut Fund for the Environment and 11 other plaintiffs filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court Tuesday in order to stop the $165 million sweep.Using the funding for other than its intended purpose is a breach of the contracts clause of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs argue.

Recreation bigger share of economu than ag or mining

Daily Yonder | Posted on May 16, 2018

The outdoor recreation industry is a critical engine for the national economy, larger in size than the agriculture and fossil fuel mining and drilling sectors, according to a recent Department of Commerce report. The report also said that rural communities and small business owners are a key ingredient in the growing economic engine.

NeighborWorks America reports nearly $3.6 billion in rural economic impact in fiscal year 2017

Pilot Online | Posted on May 16, 2018

NeighborWorks America announced today that in 2017, members of the NeighborWorks network leveraged nearly $3.6 billion of investment in rural communities. A total of 166 NeighborWorks organizations – 67.5 percent of the network – serve rural America. In 2017, NeighborWorks members created or maintained more than 35,000 jobs in rural communities. Facilitating access to financial services and other programs that create ladders of opportunity is critical for people in rural communities. A recent NeighborWorks America consumer finance survey found that 46 percent of U.S.

Energy News

MN Gov. Mark Dayton vetoes bill that gave Enbridge's new pipeline fast-track approval

Minnesota Star Tribune | Posted on May 22, 2018

As expected, Gov. Mark Dayton vetoed legislation that would have allowed Enbridge to build a controversial new oil pipeline without getting regulatory approval.

Americans want more clean energy. Here's what they're actually willing to do to get it

CNBC | Posted on May 17, 2018

Consumers are growing more concerned about climate change and their carbon footprint, according to an annual survey from Deloitte. The gap between environmental concern and consumer action is poised to shrink as tech-minded millennials make green choices in their daily lives. Interest is growing in home battery systems paired with solar panels and time-of-use rates, but privacy concerns could hold back adoption of smart home devices.

Will Battle Between 'Big Corn' And 'Big Oil' Stall Next Generation Biofuels?

Investors Business Daily | Posted on May 17, 2018

Currently, almost every gallon of gasoline contains 10% ethanol made from corn and 90% petroleum gasoline refined from crude oil as a result of the federal Renewable Fuel Standard. (RFS). However, declining gasoline use is intensifying the existing fight between big oil companies and the corn ethanol industry (or Big Corn) over how much of the shrinking transportation fuel pie each gets. The most immediate impact of the RFS wars is to focus attention on corn ethanol and petroleum gasoline at the detriment of second-generation biofuels.

Mountain Valley Pipeline cited for environmental violations

Miami Herald | Posted on May 17, 2018

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project has been cited for failing to control erosion at two work sites just two months after construction started on the more than 300-mile (483-kilometer) pipeline through Virginia and West Virginia. The Roanoke Times reported Wednesday that an inspection found flaws in erosion and sediment control measures last month at two sites in Wetzel County.

5 states join Utah in legal fight over Washington state coal-export terminal

The Salt Lake Tribune | Posted on May 16, 2018

Six Western states and national industry groups have lined up against Washington state in a legal battle over its decision to reject permits for a massive proposed coal-export terminal on the Columbia River.Wyoming, Montana, Kansas, Utah, South Dakota and Nebraska filed a joint amicus brief, arguing in support of project backers and saying the case has broad implications for the export of commodities that are important to many states.

Food News

The line between food and medicine is blurrier than ever — and the FDA needs to step up its game

The Verge | Posted on May 17, 2018

Is tea medicine? What about special Collagen Beautèa that promises to support your bones? The Wall Street Journal reported on the growing popularity of foods and beverages enhanced with collagen, an ingredient used in wrinkle cream that hasn’t really been proven to be helpful when you eat it. The line between “food” and “medicine” has always been blurry, and, traditionally, the US Food and Drug Administration only regulates the latter.

Organic food fans unlikely to be swayed by negative news

Meatingplace (free registration required) | Posted on May 16, 2018

A recent report raising questions about the quality and safety of organic foods is unlikely to change the buying habits of consumers of such products, according to research from NPD Group. The market information company found that organic food lovers strongly believe in their nutritional knowledge and healthy lifestyle and are therefore unlikely to switch to all-natural or commercially grown foods even when concerns about pesticide levels, for example, are raised in the media.

Dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation

Science Daily | Posted on May 10, 2018

New research shows there might be health benefits to eating certain types of dark chocolate. Findings from two studies being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego show that consuming dark chocolate that has a high concentration of cacao (minimally 70% cacao, 30% organic cane sugar) has positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity.

F.D.A. orders first-ever mandatory recall

Food Business News | Posted on May 10, 2018

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, for the first time, has ordered a mandatory recall of food products under the authority conferred on the agency by the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2010. The F.D.A. on April 3 issued a mandatory recall order for all regulated products containing powered kratom manufactured, processed, packed or held by Triangle Pharmanaturals L.L.C., Las Vegas, after several were found to contain Salmonella. The ingredient primarily is used in dietary supplements. The F.D.A.

E. coli illnesses linked to lettuce expand to 29 states

Washington Examiner | Posted on May 10, 2018

Four more states have reported E. coli contaminations in romaine lettuce, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported. Twenty-eight more people have become ill, bringing the total to 149 people in 29 states. Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Texas were added to the rolls. Data collection can take time to reach the CDC, meaning that there may be several other instances of people getting sick that haven't been reported. The total count comes from data as of April 25.